Volume 6, Issue 6, November 2020, Page: 73-76
Comparative Evaluation of Mortality and Hemodynamic Performance Between ATS and ST JUDE Mechanical Heart Valves in Mitral and Aortic Positions
Mohammad Rafi Hamidi, Deputy ARCS Health, Senior Fellow Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery Global Medical Complex Heart Institute, Kabul, Afghanistan
Manizha Meena, Fellows Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery; Global Medical Complex Heart Institute, Kabul, Afghanistan
Mezhgan Zaher, Fellows Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery; Global Medical Complex Heart Institute, Kabul, Afghanistan
Mohammad Hussain Shiwa, Fellows Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery; Global Medical Complex Heart Institute, Kabul, Afghanistan
Abdul Wahid Hussaini, Fellows Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery; Global Medical Complex Heart Institute, Kabul, Afghanistan
Assadullah Hassani, Head Department of Cardiology, Global Medical Complex Heart Institute, Kabul, Afghanistan
Manochihr Timorian, Head Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery Global Medical Complex Heart Institute, Kabul, Afghanistan
Received: Oct. 15, 2020;       Accepted: Oct. 26, 2020;       Published: Nov. 19, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijcts.20200606.11      View  26      Downloads  6
Abstract
Background: Rheumatic heart disease is the most common heart disease in Asian countries especially in Afghanistan, the age adjusted death rate for this heart disease is 27,57 per 100 000 people as published by data of the World Health Organization (WHO). ST JUDE mechanical heart valve first time implanted in October 1977 and quickly became the gold standard for subsequent valves, and ATS medical international developed a mechanical heart valve that has been in use since 1992, these mechanical heart valves started implantation in Afghanistan during 2012. We presented a result of 148 patients who have undergone valve replacement in mitral and aortic position with ATS and ST JUDE mechanical heart valves at departments of cardiothoracic and vascular surgery amiri medical complex and global medical complex heart institute Kabul Afghanistan. Method and results: we performed ATS and ST JUDE mechanical heart valve replacement in 148 patients between May 2015 and April 2018 at both the Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery Global Medical Complex heart institute and Amiri Medical Complex, Kabul Afghanistan. Male patients were 69 (46.6%) and female patients were 79 (53.3%), age range was between 11-65 years, 94 (63.5%) patients under went mitral valve replacement, for 38 (25.6%) patients performed aortic valve replacement and 16 (10.8%) patients required double valve replacement, overall mortality was 16 (10.8%) patients for mitral, aortic and double valve replacement. The early mortality (hospital mortality) was 4.05% and late mortality during a 3 year follow up was 6.7%. Conclusion: there were seen a few prosthetic valve complications after ATS and ST JUDE mechanical heart valve implantation (total number of implanted ATS mechanical heart valve were 70 and total number of implanted ST JUDE mechanical heart valve were 78), early mortality was (hospital mortality) 6 patients (4.05%) and late mortality during a 3 year follow up was 10 patients (6.7%). The international normalized ratio (INR) was maintained between (2.5-3.5) in both ATS and ST JUDE mechanical heart valves for mitral position and (2-3) for aortic position, hemodynamically ATS and ST JUDE mechanical heart valves are very good regarding trans valvular gradient and function but low prosthetic valve noise is just seen in ATS mechanical heart valve.
Keywords
Cardiac Surgery, Valve Surgery, Mitral and Aortic Valve Replacement
To cite this article
Mohammad Rafi Hamidi, Manizha Meena, Mezhgan Zaher, Mohammad Hussain Shiwa, Abdul Wahid Hussaini, Assadullah Hassani, Manochihr Timorian, Comparative Evaluation of Mortality and Hemodynamic Performance Between ATS and ST JUDE Mechanical Heart Valves in Mitral and Aortic Positions, International Journal of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery. Vol. 6, No. 6, 2020, pp. 73-76. doi: 10.11648/j.ijcts.20200606.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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